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Our NFL Draft Analysis — The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

It's too early to grade, we analyze the most interesting anecdotes and tidbits from the draft.

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The Real NFL Draft Analysis. Our long national nightmare is over. No more mock drafts, bogus claims from “sources” close to teams, or Mel Kiper Jr. obsessing over which quarterback will go number one. Now NFL fans can get back to real news, like which player will get arrested first. Or what GM is on the hot seat after reaching for the pick in round one. Let’s analyze the most interesting tidbits from the first round as well as the four days in Dallas.

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Penn State RB Saquon Barkley poses with commissioner Roger Goodell. The New York Giants selected Barkley second overall in the 2018 NFL Draft. (AP)

The First Five

1. Cleveland Browns: Baker Mayfield, QB, Oklahoma. Mayfield going No. 1 overall was a shock. But more surprising is that he was in play to be Tom Brady’s backup. ESPN reported that if the Browns passed on Mayfield, the New England Patriots planned to trade up to select the Heisman Trophy winner. Mayfield’s agent Jack Mills made these comments on “The Business of Sports with Andrew Brandt” podcast.

2. New York Giants: Saquon Barkley, RB, Penn State. The Giants are all in on Eli Manning. Big Blue could have drafted Manning’s heir apparent, but instead added one of the highest rated players in the entire draft. Barkley is on cloud nine, but also is focused on his checks and new ‘side piece’ game. When Suzy Kolber asked him to shout out his girlfriend on national TV, the interview got awkward. (Courtesy brobible.com)

3. New York Jets: Sam Darnold, QB, USC. Todd McShay of ESPN reports Gang Green scouted Darnold for 18 months and were shocked when the Trojan fell in their laps. Hopefully, the Jets give the 20-year old time to mature behind veteran Josh McCown. The offense would be in better shape if the front office busts WR Robby Anderson out of prison and gets him back on the field.

4. Cleveland Browns: Denzel Ward, CB, Ohio St. The Browns’ second pick in the top five began the run on defensive players. Nearly 50 percent of the first round were defensive players. Experts and the Dallas crowd expected DE Bradley Chubb to be the pick. The Browns threw a curveball and selected the undersized Buckeye.

5. Denver Broncos: Bradley Chubb, DE, NC State. Arguably the best player in the draft. The Broncos have declined the fifth-year option on LB Shane Ray. Once considered a promising prospect, Ray is now expendable. But before the 2019 off-season, matching up Chubb with Von Miller makes a stout Denver defense even more formidable.

Six through Ten

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The Arizona Cardinals selected UCLA’s Josh Rosen in the 2018 NFL draft. Rosen poses with commissioner Roger Goodell. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

6. Indianapolis Colts: Quenton Nelson, OG, Notre Dame. It’s a good idea to draft talented offensive guards. But for Indy, it’s more likely Quenton Nelson will be protecting backup Jacoby Brissett rather than No. 1 draft pick in 2012, Andrew Luck. GM Chris Ballard still can’t state equivocally that Luck will be ready for Week 1 of the regular season. The Colts are publicly stating any timetable for Luck’s return. The Stanford grad continues to rehab his surgically repaired right shoulder.

7. Buffalo Bills: Josh Allen, QB, Wyoming. Every time the NFL makes progress in combating racism, another crisis rears its ugly head. After a season when several owners joined players in kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality, racist attitudes are still prevalent. 24 hours before the draft news broke that QB Josh Allen, who some teams graded as the No. 1 QB prospect, sent racist tweets and used the “n” word in conversations. The tweets (courtesy of TMZ Sports) read:

“I don’t think you n**gas want a troubled son!”–June 14, 2012

“N**gas Trying To Get At Me.”– February 12, 2013

“Bout to show up these N**gas at pong.”– February 26, 2012

“If it ain’t white, it ain’t right.” — June 25, 2013

Way to go. Josh. Good luck with your new teammates.

8. Chicago Bears: Roquan Smith, LB, Georgia. ESPN described Smith as the next Brian Urlacher. Go Dawgs!

9. San Francisco 49ers: Mike McGlinchey, OT, Notre Dame. Matt Ryan’s cousin was the top rated OT in the draft and the second-best offensive lineman overall. The 49ers know where their bread is buttered. The team brass needs to do everything it can to protect QB’s Jimmy Garroppolo’s handsome face.

10. Arizona Cardinals: Josh Rosen, QB, UCLA. Rosen had the best reaction to his selection in Round 1. He was pissed off. Let’s hope he proves those nine teams wrong. (Ed Werder courtesy of Bleacher Report.)

Odds and Ends

26. Atlanta Falcons: Calvin Ridley, WR, Alabama. Steal of the first round in our opinion. Ridley could become fantasy owners’ wet dream as defenses game plan to take away Julio Jones from Matty Ice.

32. Baltimore Ravens: Lamar Jackson, QB, Louisville. Props to Ravens retiring general manager Ozzie Newsome. In his last draft, Newsome traded up to pick the versatile signal caller and 2016 Heisman Trophy winner. Joe Flacco, you are officially on notice.

Rd. 2, 27. Washington Redskins: Derrius Guice, RB, LSU. Guice’s first year in the nation’s capital will be memorable. In a pre-draft meeting, Guice reportedly had an altercation with Eagles running backs coach Duce Staley. Plus, Guice alleged an unnamed team asked him if he liked men and how he felt about his mother being a prostitute during his interviews at the combine. Damn.

Rd. 5, 4. Seattle Seahawks: Shaqeem Griffin, LB, Central Florida. The one-handed linebacker wowed NFL evaluators with his tremendous performance at the combine. Even though he fell to the fifth round after his 40-yard dash time was corrected to 4.58, his ability to play big-time college football is miraculous. Props to the Seahawks for selecting Griffin and reuniting him with his twin brother, Shaquill.

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